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Journal Citation & Impact Searching: Home

Resources for ranking & tracking

How Do I Evaluate Journals?

Using Journal Citation Reports (JCR)

Databases for Journal Citation Searching

We do not have Web of Science (Science, Social Science, & Arts & Humanities citation linkages database) at UND.  (NDSU has some of the Web of Science Database).  Try some of these other UND licensed databases below:

Databases & Websites for Journal Reports & Impact Factors

Web Resources

Further Reading

Definitions of Journal Tools & Measures

Article Influence Score--Indicates the relative importance of a journal on a per-article basis.  The Journal's Eigenfactor Score divided by the fraction of articles published by the Journal.  The sum total of articles from all journals is 1.  A score greater than 1.00 indicates that each article in the journal has above-average influence.  A score less than 1.00 indicates that each article has below-average influence.  (Uses Thomson Reuters JCR citation data).

Eigenfactor Score--Uses Thomson Reuters JCR citation data & measures the number of times articles from the journal published in the past 5 years have been cited in the JCR year.

Impact Factor--Average number of times articles from the journal published in the past 2 years have been cited in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) year using Thomson Reuter's citation data.  An Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published 1 or 2 years ago have been cited 1 time.

Journal Analyzer Tool--Search for a journal title and "View Journal Analyzer" for a Line Chart or Table.  This provides a view of journal performance using Elsevier citation data.  It charts the SJR score, SNIP score, total number of citations received by the journal, total number of documents of the journal, & the percentage of documents that are not cited from that year.

SJR (SCImago Journal Rank)--Uses Elsevier data.  In SCOPUS.  The SJR score starts with a basic per peer-reviewed document measure that is the number of citations received by a journal divided by the number of citations in that journal for the 3 previous years.  SJR then weighs the citations with a prestige metric that normalizes across the citation behavior of different journals.

SNIP (Source Normalized Impact per Paper)--Uses Elsevier data.  In SCOPUS.  The SNIP score starts with a basic per peer-reviewed document measure that is the number of citations received by a journal divided by the number of citations in the journal for the 3 previous years.  SNIP then considers the citations in the context in which they are made (the journal), including a citation's potential (or how likely it is to be cited) that normalizes across disciplines.

These brief definitions have been taken from "Citation Searching & Bibliometric Measures" by Kear.  See article under Further Reading for the full definitions.

Definitions of Citation Tools & Measures

Citation Map--Shows the citations/references backwards and forwards from a selected document, so it shows the impact that a document has on a field, topic, or trend.  (Web of Knowledge created this tool).

Citation Report--A graphical presentation of a set of articles.  Citation reports show trends of a topic, how an author has published over time, and the most cited articles related to a search topic.  (Web of Kowledge tool).

Citation Tracker--In SCOPUS, select "View Citation Overview" for a marked document in order to see the h-index and an overview of how many times a selected document has been cited upon its initial selection & the number of documents that have cited the selected document since 1996.

h-graph--Depicts the impact of an author's research or set of articles.  Select h-graph in SCOPUS.  One can also view the h-index, articles published, and citations.

h-index--An index to quantify the cumulative impact and relevance of an author.  In Web of Knowledge find the h-index under the Citation Reports section.  In SCOPUS, search and select an author's hyperlinked name for the h-index.  View video below about the h-index.

These brief definitions have been taken from "Citation Searching & Bibliometric Measures" by Kear.   See article under Further Reading for the full definitions.